Pepperdine Law School Professor Richard Cupp has posted on SSRN.com an article that is forthcoming in the Florida Law Review entitled Cognitively Impaired Humans, Intelligent Animals, and Legal Personhood.

The article may be downloaded for free at http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2775288.

This Article analyzes whether courts should grant legal personhood to intelligent animal species, such as chimpanzees,

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the Nonhuman Rights Project (NhRP) filed another petition for a writ of habeas corpus (available of NhRP’s website) to:

a) require Respondents to justify their detention of a chimpanzee named Tommy,

b) order Tommy’s immediate discharge, and

c) order Tommy’s transfer to an appropriate primate sanctuary, which the NhRP suggests is

With the constant attacks on people and businesses working with animals humanely in entertainment, biomedical research, animal agriculture, and with companion animals, it is encouraging to learn of at least one conservation effort where protecting wildlife does not involve condemning farmers or ranchers. Too often, farmers and ranchers are viewed with disdain by conservationists who

Republished with permission from author Amanda Dettmer, Ph.D.

During their annual meeting in Chicago, the Society for Neuroscience (SFN) yesterday held a 2-hour lunchtime session dedicated to public outreach concerning animals in research. The panelists were international experts on communicating the importance of animal research to the public, and they offered invaluable advice to

As reported in expressnews.com, “Joseph Larsen, a Houston­based open records lawyer, said if Texas A&M owns the animals, the chapter cited in the attorney general’s opinion that grants veterinarian-­client confidentiality should not apply because the veterinarians are working for the university. He said the law applies only to veterinarians who see animals that are owned by someone else.” However, nothing in the Texas Veterinary Practice Act provides such an exception.
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Co-authored by Elizabeth G. Litten, Esq. and Nancy E. Halpern, DVM, Esq.  Also posted on HIPAA, HITECH & HIT

HIPAA does not protect animals’ health information – it applies to the protected health information (or PHI) of an “individual”, defined as “the person who is the subject of” the PHI. However, state laws governing

Indiana state legislators asked their state Attorney General to investigate the Humane Society of the United States, “accus[ing] the group of deceptive fundraising practices, saying its advertisements mislead Hoosiers into believing that donations will benefit abandoned pets at local humane society shelters, which are not affiliated with the national group,” as reported on indystar.com.

Originally published: SAN ANTONIO, July 1, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/

Republished with permission

Words can hurt you if you ignore these extremists! They’ve been telling us their agenda to end all interaction with animals for years, but few believed them.

Animal “rights” groups profess to work for improved animal treatment while their ultimate goal is to abolish