by Matthew R. Bailey Originally Published 6:30 a.m. ET April 17, 2020 | Updated 7:06 a.m. ET April 17, 2020

Scientists are working on dozens of potential treatments and vaccines for the novel coronavirus and the disease it causes, COVID-19. Virtually all of them have one thing in common — they’re the product of animal

This was just published by the Foundation for Biomedical Research.  The use of animal models for researching coronavirus and other fatal human and animal diseases and disorders bears repeating, again and again.

Animal research is at the front lines of the battle with the coronavirus and with the help of animal models, a vaccine and 

Despite activists’ rhetoric that animal models are not necessary for the advancement of biomedical research and development,  the criticality of the continued use of animal models in biomedical research is highlighted by Americans for Medical Progress and the Foundation for Biomedical Research (see respectively, AMP’s COVID-19 Resources The Critical Role of Animals in Developing COVID-19

Despite myths perpetuated by animal activists, animal models remain critical to ensure that vaccines developed to prevent COVID 19 infections do not make those patients worse as a result of such treatment, as Dr. Fauci recently acknowledged during a briefing at the White House.

As also reported in Catching up to Coronavirus: Top 60 Treatments

Here is a glimpse into what happened at the tail end (ha!) of the 2018-2019 New Jersey Legislative Session.

Homes for Animal Heroes

The Homes for Animal Heroes bill, S 2826, made it over the final hurdle on the last day of this legislative session in New Jersey, passing 75-0 in the Assembly on

An increasing tactic of animal rights organizations (AR) is to mine public records in the hopes of finding ammunition to use against universities, pharmaceutical companies, contract research organizations and associated vendors.

People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has used data from public records to launch a database of universities, grading them “bad” to “worse,”

New therapies, advancements rely on dog research

Recently, Secretary of Veterans Affairs Robert Wilkie did something rarely seen in Washington, D.C., these days. He told the truth despite pressure from special interest groups to do otherwise. Mr. Wilkie explained that, like many other Americans, he is a dog lover. However, he also supports health studies

Clinical trials are commonly used during the development of drugs studied for approval by FDA for the use in animals.  Similar use in veterinary medicine has been increasing, but there are a number of interesting issues not considered in human clinical trials, where the individual involved in such trials is able to provide consent for

The New Jersey Senate Environment and Energy Committee unanimously voted to release the Homes for Animal Heroes Act (S2826) from committee.  The bill would requires institutions of higher education to offer cats and dogs for adoption when they are no longer needed for education, research or other scientific purposes.  During the hearing on September

Americans for Medical Progress (AMP) “supports research involving animals when it is necessary to advance our understanding of biological processes.” and provides tools for “public outreach that builds understanding and appreciation for necessary and humane animal research.”

The latest tool in their toolbox is a video “designed to be a conversation starter about the importance