Veterinary Examining Boards

As a veterinarian, if a pet-owner comes to you with questions or concerns about the safety of hemp or CBD infused pet products, are you prepared to navigate the conversation?

Practicing veterinarians are subject to the regulation of several entities, both state and federal, including the FDA, the DEA, and their respective state veterinary and

The California Veterinary Medical Board (Board) will meet by teleconference at 9:00 a.m., on Thursday, January 28, 2021 to discuss, amongst other agenda items, a “Presentation and Discussion on Access to Veterinary Care in California” presented by representatives from San Francisco Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SF SPCA) and Humane Society of

A317, a bill that would require annual inspection of animal or veterinary facilities as defined in Section 1 pf P.L. 1983, c. 98, has been re-introduced in the State Assembly.

Animal or veterinary facility, defined as incorporated, means “any fixed or mobile establishment, veterinary hospital, animal hospital or premises wherein or whereon the practice of

FDA has recently announced it is relaxing its enforcement of telemedicine for veterinarians under two federal provisions:  (1) when prescribing extralabel drug use; and (2) when prescribing medicate feed pursuant to the Veterinary Feed Directive.  Both generally require an initial physical examination of animals prior to such prescription.

FDA only enforces certain regulations governing a

Veterinarians in New Jersey are hereby notified of amendments to existing regulations governing continuing veterinary educational requirements and supervision of veterinary students in training by state licensees.

First, continuing veterinary education (CVE) requirements have been amended to require one credit hour of CVE “in topics concerning prescription opioid drugs, including the risks and signs of

Effective client communications is the key to success in many professions, including the practice of veterinary medicine. While serving on the New Jersey State Board of Veterinary Medicine for nearly a decade, I was continuously surprised by the number of complaints filed against veterinarians for what amounted to a failure to adequately communicate with client. 

As reported in expressnews.com, “Joseph Larsen, a Houston­based open records lawyer, said if Texas A&M owns the animals, the chapter cited in the attorney general’s opinion that grants veterinarian-­client confidentiality should not apply because the veterinarians are working for the university. He said the law applies only to veterinarians who see animals that are owned by someone else.” However, nothing in the Texas Veterinary Practice Act provides such an exception.
Continue Reading HIPAA-Type Protections Are Not Just For Humans – When It Comes To Medical Records, Animals Have Privacy Rights, Too (Part 2)

Co-authored by Elizabeth G. Litten, Esq. and Nancy E. Halpern, DVM, Esq.  Also posted on HIPAA, HITECH & HIT

HIPAA does not protect animals’ health information – it applies to the protected health information (or PHI) of an “individual”, defined as “the person who is the subject of” the PHI. However, state laws governing

The Texas Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners recently amended or adopted an impressive number of regulations governing the practice of veterinary medicine that may be of interest to other examining boards across the country.

In October, 2014, the Board voted to publish the proposed rules in the Texas Register for comment which are now available