A bill (A3899) prohibiting veterinary declawing procedures in New Jersey will be considered by the Assembly Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee on Monday, November 14, 2016.

This bill would create civil and criminal liabilities for any person who shall:

Perform, or cause to be performed, an onychectomy (declawing) or flexor tendonectomy procedure on

The City Law includes mandatory sterilization requirements for 8 week-old puppies and kittens who weigh at least 2 pounds.

The question is not “can the surgery be performed on a 2 pound 8 week old puppy” but rather, based on the totality of the circumstances, can the veterinarian recommend the procedure for a puppy or

FDA, gearing up for the implementation of the Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD), recently “issued a letter reminding retail establishments that sell medically important antimicrobials for use in feed or water for food animals that the marketing status of those products will change from over-the-counter (OTC) to prescription (Rx) or to veterinary feed directive (VFD)

A bill recently introduced in Rhode Island, S2180, would amend that state’s veterinary practice act by “allowing non-veterinarians to perform certain husbandry procedures that are commonly performed by owners of animal pets and livestock.”

Specifically, amendments provide that the practice of veterinary medicine does not include:

A person who conducts routine vaccinations or testing of

As reported in expressnews.com, “Joseph Larsen, a Houston­based open records lawyer, said if Texas A&M owns the animals, the chapter cited in the attorney general’s opinion that grants veterinarian-­client confidentiality should not apply because the veterinarians are working for the university. He said the law applies only to veterinarians who see animals that are owned by someone else.” However, nothing in the Texas Veterinary Practice Act provides such an exception.
Continue Reading HIPAA-Type Protections Are Not Just For Humans – When It Comes To Medical Records, Animals Have Privacy Rights, Too (Part 2)

Co-authored by Elizabeth G. Litten, Esq. and Nancy E. Halpern, DVM, Esq.  Also posted on HIPAA, HITECH & HIT

HIPAA does not protect animals’ health information – it applies to the protected health information (or PHI) of an “individual”, defined as “the person who is the subject of” the PHI. However, state laws governing

The Texas Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners recently amended or adopted an impressive number of regulations governing the practice of veterinary medicine that may be of interest to other examining boards across the country.

In October, 2014, the Board voted to publish the proposed rules in the Texas Register for comment which are now available

A bill which would require veterinarians to provide written notification to pet owners concerning the absence of animal supervision after normal business hours is advancing through the New Jersey legislature, titled “Betsy’s Law.”

Prior versions of the bill inappropriately stated that it was intended to “supplement . . . Title 4 of the

A bill was recently introduced in the New Jersey Assembly that would require licensure of all “pet” groomers.  Applicants for a pet grooming license will have to pass a practical and technical examination prepared by or approved by the State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners (the “Board”).

At first blush, it may seem entirely reasonable